Bird Face Wendy

Things relevant to reading, writing, publishing or marketing teen fiction.

10 Things I Learned From My Facebook Party

on September 16, 2015
Number_10_8729 (5)

Image courtesy of Morguefile free photos

… that might help with yours!

Last week I hosted a virtual event celebrating the release of the first two novels of my Bird Face series. The party was great fun, but as one author friend recognized, a lot of work.

There’s nothing like attending a few Facebook parties to get a feel for their dynamics before you make the decision whether or not to host one. I popped into several as I geared up to create my own. I recommend you visit a few—to participate in or simply “lurk”—and pay attention to the following.

  1. If you’ve selected a location city in your true time zone for the Facebook account that is associated with your event, the time zone for your party will be correct. I didn’t have a city designated beforehand, and my first party notification showed up with the wrong zone. If you don’t want to give your exact location on Facebook, choose another one in your time zone. You will see a time zone indicated on any Facebook event page you visit.
  2. Choose the day and time period for your party carefully. I had to consider a number of things. School had started, so teens and teachers were busy during the middle of the day. Football season had kicked in (no pun intended), and high school or college games might be scheduled on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday evenings. The Friday of the week I chose happened to be 9/11, so I didn’t want to use that day. I chose Thursday and decided to start the party right before lunch (mine), which would be morning on the U.S. west coast and lunchtime on the east. I hoped that would catch interested stay-at-home parents, home educators, and people on their lunch breaks. (Someone dropped in for a while before heading to work.) The party hours extended until 7 p.m. to include people after school and after some day jobs in most time zones.
  3. Choose the length of the event to suit yourself and anyone helping you. There’s nothing wrong with a short party of two hours. Mine was long for more reasons than I mentioned above. One reason was that I recently moved and didn’t know when I’d make the acquaintance of enough people to invite to an actual party. Another was that I no longer work a day job, so I figured I might as well make the most of a virtual party.
  4. As discussed in Behind the Scenes—12 tasks for book authors before the release, have at least one giveaway. In addition to your books and books from other authors, consider some unusual items that relate to your story. Either hint about the connection or come right out and say it. The most popular giveaway at my party was an art print donated by a book illustrator that related to my character’s love for animals. If your party is short, you may have time for only one or two giveaways. I had twelve. Remember—for any giveaway that you are responsible for shipping or mailing, the cost for that might be more than the value of the giveaway. But for me, having fun with my party’s attendees was more important.
  5. Make the criteria for entering each giveaway you planned interesting but not too exclusive. I scared myself during two of them. One novel being given away was about twins, and I asked for comments to be about twins the person commenting knew. I wanted the comments to be entertaining, but it took so long for anyone to comment, I wondered if perhaps not many people knew or remembered twins. Another novel was about angels. I’d heard a lot of guardian-angel stories in my life and thought that sharing a true-life guardian angel story would be a good criterion for commenting and entering the giveaway. Again, participation was minimal. Sometimes the criterion for a giveaway was simply to express a desire for it. Sometimes including a photo gave the commenter an additional entry.
  6. How do you schedule the giveaways? I struggled with this the most. In the initial planning, I thought I’d have each giveaway run two hours but overlap. Then reality set in. I was afraid I would lose track. I was glad I decided to have one contest (with me as judge) that ran most of the party but have the other giveaways last one hour each (except for a special one that extended to two hours). I did run two one-hour giveaways simultaneously when it seemed appropriate. For example, during a giveaway for boys, I also ran one for girls. However, I made all giveaways start and stop exactly at any given hour. So a giveaway might read like this—2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
    GIVEAWAY blah-blah-blah, and state how to enter.
  7. There may be lulls in participation activity, but there may be times when you need someone to fix you a snack because you’re afraid to tear your eyes away from the screen. I experienced a 30-minute period of no activity during my lunchtime (contrary to what I believed would happen), so I made sure to stretch and take care of personal matters.
  8. I cannot stress how important having prepared posts ready and waiting on a Word document was. It allowed me to play with the timing and wording of giveaways in advance. And I was able to copy from the document and paste each new giveaway onto the Facebook event page in a second as an old one was ending. I was able to easily repeat later in the day a giveaway that had no activity earlier. It happened to be the one for the art print, which became wildly popular by evening.
  9. Obviously, you must picture your giveaways so people know exactly what they’d receive if they won. I had a folder on my desktop containing all the book covers and other images I needed for my posts. So … copy and past the necessary text, attach the correct image(s), and voila!
  10. On everything but the contest, the names of the entrants were written on squares of paper, folded up, and placed in a “hat,” which was actually a bowl. I used two bowls at once because of the way I structured my party, but you might do something different. The winning name for each giveaway was drawn from the hat/bowl. This worked fine. I announced the winner immediately in a comment on that giveaway’s post and asked the person to message me with the needed e-mail or physical address, as the case may have been. For winners who did not contact me by the end of the party, I messaged them. If a winner was a friend of a friend, I also messaged her for help.

In the end, my party was worth the effort. Not only did I attract new readers to my books but also to the other authors’ that donated theirs as giveaways.

If you’ve hosted a Facebook event, how did it go? What can you share that you learned? If it was a book launch party, I’d love to hear if you experienced anything very different from mine.

Cynthia

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8 responses to “10 Things I Learned From My Facebook Party

  1. Donn Taylor says:

    Excellent info, Cynthia. It might be well to begin with instruction on how the party works: answering and commenting only on one thread at a time, how the hostess announces that she’s closing a thread, how to navigate from that thread to the next, etc. I’ve been to a couple of parties that became mass confusion. No one knew where to post what.

  2. Donn, one thing I did that helped with that is I checked the feature under Edits “Only hosts can post on the event wall.” That way, I didn’t have unexpected “outsider” posts (as pleasant as they might be) popping up at the top of my page when I wanted attendees to see the current giveaways and their comments. As each giveaway was about to end, I made a comment “This giveaway is closing” so anyone who tried to comment after that knew they were too late. Thanks for bringing that issue up! However, if two giveaways were going on at the same time, attendees were free to comment on both of them if they chose.

  3. Anthea Kotlan says:

    Thank you for helping to begin to de-mystify the process of hosting an on-line party. I can see a great deal of planning went into your gathering. I appreciate your honesty about missteps and warnings about potential problems. As always I love the list format because it is so accessible, and so fitting given your book series. Social media requires a great deal of careful and meticulous planning in order to appear to be fun and spontaneous.

  4. Thank you for your comments, Anthea. I hope revealing the good and not-so-good aspects of my Facebook event will ease some of the stress other writers feel before attempting one.

  5. Cynthia, I love your page. I’m still struggling with this blog thing. I think I can learn a lot from yours.

    • Thank you, Sharon. I’m still learning too but would be happy to share my limited knowledge if you have a question I am able to answer.

      • Thank you, Cynthia. So far, I only blog when I feel I have something to say to a whole lot of people. Other than that, I pretty much stay with Twitter and Facebook. What about you?

      • I like Facebook and Twitter for short daily messages and promos. I try to blog twice a month to share what I’ve learned along my writing journey and talk about things that might interest my readers and/or other writers. I can’t fit it all in otherwise, but I do share the blog link on Facebook and Twitter.

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